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Archive for the ‘Faculty’ Category

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Jacqueline Kunkel

Monday, December 19th, 2016

3006C Proud Mary

Thursday, 4006C Seeing Spots

Friday, 5006C Island Breeze

and on Saturday, 6703C Vintage Compass

Jacqueline Kunkel, her husband, and her two “wonderful Quilt Inspector Kitties,” recently completed a cross country move from Connecticut to Mesa, Arizona. Why the move? Jacqueline had been coming to the valley since her grandparents moved there in 1970.  Jacqueline and her husband had been going to Arizona for about 30 years.  She has lots of family there (Mom and Dad, Cousins, Aunt and Uncle), so  they have developed a love for the desert and Arizona. Jacqueline blames her husband for her start in quilting. When she was pregnant with their first child, he suggested that Jacqueline get a hobby.  At the time, she was a garment sewer and heavy into making baby clothes for their newborn.  She took a formal quilting class, at her husband’s urging, and hated it.  She says it was probably because of the format in which it was taught: cutting cardboard templates with scissors.  No rotary cutters, mats and rulers.  Eventually, Jacqueline took another class that had all those things and she” was hooked!!!”  That was in 1993 and it has been her hobby turned business ever since then. When Jacqueline is not quilting, she and her husband “LOVE” to hike, walk, explore, and fly (Jacqueline’s husband has his own little plane).  They fly almost every day as the Arizona weather “is just sunny and gorgeous.” What is the one quilting tool that Jacqueline can’t live without? Her glue pen.  Jacqueline says, “I use it essentially in place of pins.  It allows my fabric to lay flat and I can handle it with ease.  From paper piecing to appliqué, to binding, there really isn’t anything you can’t use it on.” When it comes to teaching, Jacqueline absolutely adores “seeing my students creating and then seeing the finished projects.  I also love helping them through the process.  It is very rewarding.” She hopes that her students walk away with more than one new tip or technique” that they can apply to their quilting in general.  Jacqueline’s best quilting tip is that she does not use steam in her iron. She always uses a dry iron as she has found over the years that steam will stretch the fabric which results in a block not fitting properly or not being square. In September, 2015, Jacqueline published a new book, Splash of Color:  A Rainbow of Brilliant Black and White Quilts. Jacqueline says that “It was born out of a desire to write about something that I love… black, white, and bright fabrics. These are fabrics that my stash is not lacking in any way shape or form.  I loved designing the quilts in this book, and better yet, thoroughly enjoy teaching them too.  I love the photos that my students and other quilters send me of their completed projects.  It is very satisfying and fulfilling… (The book) is fun, the designs are versatile, and black, white, and bright fabrics are timeless!!” To learn more about Jacqueline Kunkel, please visit her website.]]>

Meet Road 2017 Faculty Jennifer Rapacki

Monday, November 28th, 2016

4017R  Charm Pack Table Runnerjr-charm-pack-table-runner On Friday 5018R and Sunday 7011R,  Weave that Quilt Backgroundjr-5018r-weave-that-quilt-background And two half day classes utilizing technology: Saturday Morning, 6017R  Fractal That! Quilt Design on an iPad jr-6017r-fractal-that-quilt-design-on-an-ipad Saturday Afternoon, 6018R  Print That!  With Photoshop Elements6018r Jennifer Rapacki learned to sew as a young girl, starting out sewing clothing. Eventually she got into couture techniques for the clothes she made for work as well as tailoring jackets for her husband.  As the workplace became more casual, Jennifer turned to quilting as a way to continue working with fabric.   Her first quilt was actually made in 1983 from a log cabin pattern kit of calico prints.   She didn’t know to do the binding and no fabric was provided for it in the kit, so she turned the backing to the front (“we didn’t have YouTube back then”). Of course, today, Jennifer knows many ways to bind a quilt!!jennifer_rapacki Jennifer does most of her work in a quilt studio space she owns in Ventura, California because she and her husband live on a sail boat in Channel Island Harbor. She finds inspiration for her quilting “just about everywhere.”  On a recent trip to Spain and Portugal, she was continually seeing “quilt designs” on the buildings and sidewalks.  In Lisbon, she knew she was probably the only tourist continually stopping to take photos of the cobblestone sidewalks. One design is posted on her Instagram that she thought would make a great border. A brass Stiletto is Jennifer’s favorite quilting tool. She says it’s her “3rd finger.” How did Jennifer start incorporating technology in to her quilt designs and techniques? It began in 2008 when she started playing with inkjet printing on fabric on her home printer and developed a Photoshop Elements class that she taught at the local quilt shop.  It was after her quilt guild in Santa Maria asked her to speak about what she was doing with inkjet printing on fabric and Electric Quilt in 2010, that she started offering her lecture about Modern Technology for Quilters to other quilt guilds and teaching workshops.malibuonfire She began using an iPad for classes she was teaching at quilt shows because she wanted to reach a broader quilting audience who didn’t necessarily want to lug around a laptop to a show.  Plus, according to Jennifer, “the maturity of the iPad has brought more capability to the apps available.  I am continually looking at what apps are available to see if they can be applied to quilting design.” One of Jennifer’s best quilting tips is how she makes stitched mitered corner binding (joining binding in the corners).  Originally used for her custom inkjet printed binding, it also allows for changing colors in the corners along with being great to use on small quilts where it would be difficult to join binding in the middle of a side.  Quilting Arts Magazine plans to publish Jennifer’s article about this technique in the Feb/Mar 2017 issue.stars_that_i_see-lg-2 What does Jennifer like most about teaching? “Learning from my students.  I think I learn as much from them as they do from me.  I especially like when they take the technique I’m teaching and go in a direction I hadn’t thought of.” To learn more about Jennifer, please visit her Facebook Page.    ]]>

Tuffets: All The Rage Is Coming To Road 2017

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

1201R  Square Tuffet  on Monday and Tuesdaytuffet Experiencing trying times in life sometimes end up being a great motivator in trying new things. That’s exactly what happened with Pagen Lewis. Pagen’s mom and sister had always sewed, but according to Pagen, she “just didn’t get it.” About 17 years ago, when Pagen found herself going through a rough patch and had some extra time on her hands, her sister suggested that Pagen should take a quilting class. At first, Pagen “laughed” at the idea. After a lot of her sister’s pushing, Pagen finally agreed to take that class and fell, “hook, line, (and) sunk.”  About six months after that, Pagen purchased her first long arm and started quilting for charity and customers. When Pagen learned that her job that she had for 18 years in the computer industry was being moved overseas, she had six months to figure out what she was going to do next for work. As a single mother with 3 young children, she began researching how to start a business and what quilt shops were in her area. Guess what? There weren’t any!!  Within that six months, Pagen opened Quilter’s Cocoon in Riverside, California and started running her own business. That was 15 years ago and Quilter’s Cocoon is still going strong.  448x337_img_1527jpg How did Pagen get involved in making tuffets? She saw a round tuffet on-line made with Kaffe Fassett prints. She searched everywhere to purchase one. She didn’t end up finding one but she did find a place to take a class that also offered certification to teach.  That was in July, 2015. Pagen actually made two tuffets before she even went to the class for training. Pagen has taught hundreds of students how to make both round and square tuffets. She started teaching  her round tuffet classes in August, 2015. She wrote the pattern and had the fusible interfacing printed for the square tuffet and began teaching that class in June, 2016. What can you do with a tuffet? Pagen says they are perfect for “special gifts.”  She says that many tuffets have been taken over by students’ family pets and that grandchildren like using them to play favorite board games.images Pagen’s favorite tuffet was one she made out of red Kaffe Fassett Colletive fabrics. Once, she made a patriotic one for her father and on the bottom, put photos of him from the Korean War and his and her mother’s wedding photo. While there is some sewing machine work involved, Pagen’s tuffet class is part of Road 2017’s non-quilting classes that include several beadwork classes. Pagen and Quilter’s Cocoon will also have a vendor booth at Road 2017.    ]]>

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Amanda Leins

Saturday, November 12th, 2016

Amanda Leins is one of the teachers in Road 2017’s new industry room classes where students will be able to experience firsthand, quilting on both domestic and long arm machines. Amanda’s classes include: Monday 1007C  Refined Rulers: Using Templates With Domestic & Sit Down Machinesa-leins-rulers Tuesday 2010C  Blended Quilting: Combining Ruler-work With Free Motion Quilting On A Domestic Machinea-leins-blended-quilting Wednesday 3012C  Fundamentals of Free Motion Quiltinga-leins-fundamentals Thursday 4012C  Improv Quilting: Creating Curves Using Straight Linesa-leins-improv-quilting Friday  5012C Aqueducts: Piecing Curvesa-leins-aqueducts How did a trained classical archaeologist like Amanda Leins become a well-known quilter? a-leins4It all began with the men in Amanda’s family. Her maternal grandfather remembered carding the batting as a 6 year old boy during the Depression, listening to the ladies gossip as he sat underneath the quilting frame. Amanda got started in quilting on a visit to her grandparents about 14 years ago. Her “fella” (now Amanda’s husband) had to work while they were visiting so she had days to sit with her grandparents and listen to her Grampa Johnny share his love for quilts and how much he admired the ones left to their family, many of which Amanda had never seen before that trip. Her Gramma Nita had an in-cabinet Singer that many family members (mom, dad, aunts and uncles) had sewn on and Amanda wanted to be part of that tradition. Amanda made her first quilt on Gramma’s Singer, cutting things out on a coffee table, and never looked back. Amanda’s background in classical archaeology comes through with her quilting. Much of what she designs and makes is based upon the art and architecture of the ancient world. Her book shows how to take those ancient things that are timeless and still make fresh and modern designs. Amanda also appreciates how classical design principles are based upon observations of the natural world. She is thrilled to know that she is carrying on a grand tradition of working with her hands to make beautiful and functional things. She believes that “this creative act is something that is an integral part of what it is to be human.”a-leins2 Amanda has traveled all over the United States to take and teach quilting classes. Her two favorite classes that she has taken have been a practical class taught by Kimmy Brunner on trapunto and a class taught by Karen McTavish. While Amanda has yet to make a trapunto quilt, what she learned has helped with some tricky quilts that Amanda says “were less than perfect and had some extra fabric in some places and not in others.” Regarding her class with Karen McTavish, Amanda says she likes how Karen “approaches quilting design and finds her artistic process so very interesting.” What is Amanda’s favorite quilting tools?   For piecing, she cannot “live without” her glue basting and starch. For quilting, she adores working with rulers and templates, and is “wildly in love” with her BERNINA Q24 longarm which she says is “so fun to use.” Amanda’s best quilting tip is to relax and smile. She shares, “If your shoulders are down and you’re actually smiling a real (smile) and not gritting your teeth, you get less stress headaches and your quilting designs will be more fluid. If you find yourself tensing up, get up, walk around, shake out your muscles, and smile! Your body and your quilting will be grateful! [caption id="attachment_4465" align="aligncenter" width="839"]Quilt designed by Janet McWorkman and quilted by Amanda Leins for Janet's book,  "The ABCs of Quilting "(C&T) Quilt designed by Janet McWorkman and quilted by Amanda Leins for Janet’s book, “The ABCs of Quilting “(C&T)[/caption] Amanda got into quilting because “it brings me delight and being able to share that is, well, delightful!  Whether that’s providing a solid knowledge base, my tips and tricks, or sharing my love of the whole process, I want each student to come out of that class thinking ‘that was worth it. I can do this!’” You can expect Amanda to try and give as much information and time to practice in class as she can so that each student has what he or she needs to be successful and delighted in their work when they get home, not just those first few days, but as they continue to grow in their quilting abilities. To learn more about Amanda, please visit her website.]]>

Meet Road 2017 Faculty’s Three Sisters

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

Sew Kind of Wonderful and their Quick Curve RulerHelen Robinson, Jenny Pedigo and Sherilyn Mortensen.

Wednesday Evening: 3064C  Mini Kitesmini-kites

Friday Evening:  5070C Mod Pineapplesmod-pineapples

Helen Robinson, Jenny Pedigo, and Sherilyn Mortensen are three of four sisters that share their love of quilting through their business, Sew Kind of Wonderful. Currently, they live in three different states:  Sherilyn in Cedaredge, Colorado; Jenny in Everett, Washington; and Helen in Mesa, Arizona. Between them they have 14 children, 3 grandchildren, and 2 dogs. [caption id="attachment_4441" align="aligncenter" width="625"](l-r) Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn (l-r) Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn[/caption] How did these three sisters get started in quilting? About 20 years ago, Helen taught herself to quilt from a Fons and Porter book when she had to teach an after school sewing/quilting class to junior high students. She taught Jenny how to quilt soon after that.  At about the same time, Sherilyn was teaching herself because she wanted a big quilt for her bed. Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn’s quilts mostly have a modern feel. They find inspiration for their designs in everyday objects: patterns in floor tiles, weaving, nature, and also through a desire to challenge themselves to go to a different place than the usual.helen-robinson Their business, Sew Kind of Wonderful, began with Jenny’s brain child, the Quick Curve Ruler. She wanted it to be a family affair that would give the three of them a chance to see each other more often as none of them (and their other three siblings) live close to each other.quick-curve-ruler All three sisters are equally involved in the design, piecing, and quilting process.  They have a constant group text running and lots of FaceTime.  Jenny manages the distributor orders.  Helen does the online store and wholesale orders, and Sherilyn does the blogging and trunk shows. Of course, the Quick Curve Ruler and the QCR Mini Ruler are their favorite quilting tools.  They haven’t sewn a quilt without a curve in five years because their Quick Curve Ruler made quilting fun again!  Each sister also has a longarm — a Gammil Classic – that they love.  It allows them to do the whole creative quilt process from design, fabric selection, piecing and finishing it off with the quilting. Teaching classes together says Helen “is the cherry on top” because they get to see quilters when they have their ‘lightbulb’ moment; when the methods and processes they use click and their students fall in love with sewing curves. Helen adds that the sisters ‘have a great time being together!  It is the best part of our business.   If you spend any amount of time with us there is way too much conversation about ‘gluten free’ and ‘bathroom issues’….LOL” What can their students expect to get out of their classes? “Lots of energy, conversation, hands-on help, and uniquely different snacks,” reports Helen. “We want students to enjoy a no stress approach to quilting and piecing curves.  There are not any quilt police that will knock on your door at 11 pm and tell you you did it wrong.  Enjoy the quilting process.” Besides teaching their classes, you will also find Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn during the show in their vendor booth for Sew Kind Of Wonderful.  helen-robinson2 To learn more about Sew Kind of Wonderful and the Quick Curve Ruler, visit their website.  ]]>

Meet Road 2017 Teacher David Taylor

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016

Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen sit down longarm class. These classes use the same skills as a regular sewing machine.

1004C   The HQ Sweet 16 Overture on Monday

2007C  Rhythm and Hues on Tuesday

David will also be teaching two applique classes:

3009R  Simple Floral Appliqué on Wednesday

4601R  Animal Artistry through Appliqué a 3-day course, Thursday-Saturday

Award winning quilter, David Taylor, knows about adversity.  Last February, a gas explosion and subsequent fire destroyed his home in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Since the fire gutted the living room and the sewing loft, David has been without his tools and supplies for the past nine months. Both of his Berninas were melted; his serger was gone; rulers were twisted and turned and his Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen was a major loss. Needless to say, it was a very devastating experience.  David says, “Every day since the fire, life gets a little easier and a little harder at the same time. I’ve been taking long walks, reading and doing jigsaw puzzles to occupy my thoughts” until he can start to rebuild his studio.

davidmtaylor2015

Born in 1963, David was raised in Peterborough, New Hampshire, one of six children: three boys and three girls just “like the Brady Bunch.” His mother “tied” quilts while David was growing up but as a single mom with six kids, she didn’t have much free time to devote to quilting. David first focused on apparel construction. In 1998, a longtime friend who knew of David’s life-long love of fabric, suggested he try quilting. He was reluctant at first as he didn’t want to cut up his “precious fabric collection.” Since then, he has never looked back. Because he has never taken a quilting class, David believes that the best way to learn is to practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice and makes a lot of mistakes. In addition, he believes that quilting “should be a team sport,” He recommends joining a guild or a group and getting together with like-minded “fabric fondlers.” And if there isn’t a group where you live, David says, “Start one.” For David, there is no greater satisfaction than “seeing a student’s face light up when they realize they CAN do this!”  He hopes his students will learn that if they create from their heart, the rest will follow.

Before he comes to Road, David will be looking forward to purchasing a home in Henniker, New Hampshire. The house was originally built in 1825, and was renovated at the turn of this century to include a two-car garage with studio and office space above. David says it is “Perfect!” To learn more about David Taylor, please visit his website.

Meet Road 2017 Teacher Claudia Pfeil

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

Claudia Pfeil will be teaching six, hands on, stand up  longarm classes that allow for two students per machine head:

Pimp My Quilt! on Monday 1012N and Saturday 6015Npimp-my-quiltPaisley Parade on Tuesday 2017Npaisley-parade

Bubbles, Curves & Straight Lines – A Way to Modern Quilting on Wednesday 3016N  bubbles-curves-and-straight-lines

Claudia’s (P)fantastic (P)freemotion Borders on Thursday 4015Npfantastic-pfreemotion-borders

And on Friday 5016N Modern (P)freemotion Wholeclothp-freemotion-whole-cloth

At Road to California 2017, several of the class instructors are coming from outside the United States and Claudia Pfeil is one of those teachers. Claudia is from Germany. She grew up in Hemer and has lived in Krefeld since 1985. A town with a population of 240,000 in the mid-west part of Germany, close to the border of Belgium and Netherlands, Krefeld is known as the “Town of Velvet and Silk” because of its history of silk weaving. Growing up in a family of bankers, Claudia was the one who loved to draw and paint. She tried everything from pottery, silk painting, water color painting, and even making carpets out of knots.  When she graduated from school, she moved to Dortmund and started an apprenticeship as a display designer in a warehouse. It was through that job that in 1985 she was first exposed to quilting by attending Creativa –Europe’s leading exhibition for creative design.claudia-vor-quilt The biggest sewing project Claudia has ever done was the first quilt she ever made. It was made without using any rotary cutters or rulers and the basic sewing machine she used could only secure the layers for hand quilting. She taught herself the tricks of making templates and seams. According to Claudia, “there was much ‘trial and error’.” After the birth of her first son, Julian, in 1992, Claudia delved in to quilting. She found some fabric pieces she had stored away; 12 inch squares she had woven on a 16 shaft loom while attending  university. She just knew they belonged in a quilt. Needing thread to put the quilt together, Claudia went to a local sewing shop and they introduced her to her first rotary cutter, mat and quilting ruler. With perseverance, Claudia set out to “learn by doing.” She recalls that those “experimental times gave her the courage to improvise. I was soooo happy and I got hooked.” Looking back, Claudia says, “I have to smile about my self-confidence without having any clue.” Claudia has been a student of textile design, an independent textile designer, a patchwork quilting teacher, and a quilt shop owner. But she says her world changed completely in the spring of 2005 when she bought an APQS Longarm. Having taught throughout the United States, Australia, and Europe, Road 2017 will be Claudia’s first time at the show. She says, “I am really happy and proud to be invited.” All of her classes are hands on, longarm quilting classes. Her goal is to set her students free to think out of the box. She hopes they will leave the classroom with a big smile on their face, happy and proud of themselves, and remember her tips when they go home to work on their projects. To see more of Claudia’s work, please visit her Facebook Page.    ]]>

Meet Road 2017 Faculty Anita Grossman Solomon

Saturday, October 15th, 2016

Anita Grossman Solomon will be teaching six classes, Wednesday through Sunday, at Road to California 2017:

Wednesday 3005C and Sunday 7004C:  Self-Mitered Log CabinSelf-Mitered Log Cabin Top (detail) Straight Furrows

Thursday: 4004C  Two-Color Pineapple solomon-two-color-pineapple

Friday: 5004C Big Bang Starsags-big-bang-stars

Saturday (Half-day Morning Class):  6004C  BeJeweled solomon-anita-grossman-jewel-quilt-top

Saturday (Half-day Afternoon Class): 6012C Double Wrench

[caption id="attachment_4391" align="aligncenter" width="345"]Double Wrench Quilt Double Wrench Quilt[/caption]

New York native, Anita Grossman Solomon, grew up in Niagara Falls, New York.  She learned to sew garments at the Singer Sewing Center on Falls Street where she “aced” her first dart on a treadle sewing machine!! After graduating from college as an art major, Anita immediately moved to Manhattan where she lives today. Her office and sewing room/studio are both within her apartment. Anita says when she needs to venture outside, she turns “on the Today show to see what the bystanders are wearing” to know how to dress for the day,anita-grossman-solomon-bio-photo-courtesy-craftsy

The idea to start her company, Make It Simpler, began in the summer of 2001. Anita was attending a C&T Publishing retreat in northern California and showed their acquisitions editor Polaroid pictures of her work.  The editor took notice of Anita’s workaround methods and said, “I know what you do, you make it simpler.” A week later, Anita registered the domain name for Make It Simpler. Quilt blocks are what inspire Anita and define her work. “Just place one in front of my eyes and I’m fascinated.” Her first  block design for Make It Simpler was a paper piecing pattern for an unusual quilt block based on a block found on the cover of a book by Terri Zegart. “The block engaged and soothed me when I needed a distraction from the real world, ” recalled Anita. “As I closed my eyes to sleep, a radical new way to paper piece came to mind.” That began Anita’s relationship with C&T Publishing and her innovative paper piecing books. What is Anita’s favorite sewing tip?  “To thine own self be true. Make what you like and enjoy. Do what comes naturally. Trust your color and design instincts.” In her Road classes, Anita hopes her students “get satisfaction from my techniques and leave with inspired additions to their quilt-making repertoire. A lucky someone in each of my classes will win a fat quarter bundle of Make It Simpler KONA cottons courtesy of Robert Kaufman Fabrics. As for me, I always win when someone tells me ‘That tip was  worth the price of admission’.” Road to California appreciates Anita’s contribution to their charity quilt event at Road 2017 on Saturday evening, Roadies Give Back Anita specially designed the block that is being used for the quilts, deconstructing and making simpler her favorite block, Jacob’s Ladder. Of the event benefiting the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center, Anita says. “I’m finding comfort while sewing my blocks for Road. I hope you’ll follow (Road’s) footsteps and assemble a block. You can’t fathom what’s missing from the process until you try it for yourself.” Anita is really looking forward to being at Road 2017.  She hopes to “run into quilters I’ve previously met, see what they’ve been up to, and look at every quilt in the Show.” She bets that while she is in sunny California, when she turns on the Today show, she’ll see everyone in New York walking around in the snow!! You can learn more about Anita at her website and on Craftsy.  ]]>

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Rose Mary Jameson

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Rose Mary Jameson will be teaching 4018R Laguna Crochet Necklace on Thursdaylaguna-crochet-necklace

5019R   Bead Embroidered Needle Case on Fridaybead-embroidered-needle-case

 6019R   Beaded Felted Cuff on Saturday beaded-felted-cuff

And 7012R   Infinity Button Bracelet on Sundayinfinity-button-bracelet

Rose Mary Jameson is all about reinvention. A graduate of Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM), she began a custom design business, working in Ultrasuede for professional women and then later, designing bridal gowns.rose-mary When a local ice skating rink opened, she connected with the first coaches and showed them a few costume design ideas. For more than seventeen years, she designed costumes covered with Swarovski crystals and sequins for competitive skaters and a few pros who traveled the world. When the rink closed and the skaters moved away, Rose Mary replaced the ice with the dance floor and began to have the same relationship with dancers. [caption id="attachment_4357" align="aligncenter" width="398"]Costume for Cirque 1 Costume for Cirque 1[/caption] Following the opening of a large quilt and bead store, Monica’s Quilt and Bead Creations in Palm Desert, California, Rose Mary approached the owner, armed with her designs and an idea. As a result, Rose Mary has been a teacher, pattern designer and consultant for the store for over 10 years. Her adventures have included best-selling patterns, such as the Twirly Batik Skirt she developed in 2009.14b6ed_bc066a1e06a8517d7a58e1d23477cb05 Inspiration for Rose Mary’s bead designs come from “everywhere:” birds and flowers, architecture, the beach, and current fashion trends. She writes her ideas down in a journal, along with a quick sketch, notes on color combinations, or ways to wear a piece. [caption id="attachment_4358" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Rose Mary made this necklace for her daughter's wedding. Rose Mary made this necklace for her daughter’s wedding.[/caption] Rose Mary is not a new face to Road to California. She has taught several Roundabout events in the past, meeting lots of fun and creative people. “I always love being in a good space where there is creative energy and Road is certainly one of those places.” Although most guests come to Road for the quilting, Rose Mary feels that “having a little diversion could prove to be great inspiration.” She hopes that by the guests getting their hands into something a little bit unusual, perhaps their brains will start to think in different ways, leading to more excitement with their first love, quilting. Rose Mary knows many quilters who love to bead, paint and write and thinks it is “healthy to know and practice our art with diverse group of skills.” Who should attend one of Rose Mary’s classes at Road 2017?  “Anyone who might like to learn more about the art of bead-weaving or adding a little bit of bling to their lives or to their quilts. And who doesn’t like a little bit of sparkle now and again?” Rose Mary says that quilting skills translate easily into this medium and that she is looking forward to sharing with her students the “many ideas that are swirling around in my head.” She enjoys watching her students play with her ideas. “Helping others realize they might already have the skills needed to create something from a little stash of beads is always heartwarming.” You can learn more about Rose Mary Jameson on her website, Sewfast Design, or on her blog, Sewfast Beader. .  ]]>

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Sharon Miller

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

Sharon Miller will be teaching on Friday, 5067C  Espadrilles  and on Saturday,  6063C     Espadrilles  sharon-miller-one-shoe

Road to California 2017 will be featuring several handwork classes, including these beginner to intermediate level classes on how to make espadrilles shoes by Sharon  Miller. sharon-miller Espadrilles are casual, flat, shoes that originated in the Pyrenees. They usually have a canvas or cotton fabric upper and a flexible sole.sharon-miller-brocade Sharon has a Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics, clothing and textiles. She began sewing, crocheting, and tatting when she was 10 years old and has created everything from clothing and costumes to home décor, bridal gowns, crafts and quilts.sharon-miller-dress How did Sharon get started in making espadrilles? “I love new things and when I saw the espadrilles I could hardly wait to start making them.  I envisioned them with kids clothes, casual wear, in leather, and a fun bridal party activity.”sharon-miller-childs There was a bit of a learning curve in learning how to make the shoes. Sharon tried all kinds of fabrics and had to figure out how to adjust the fit for unique feet.  Luckily for Sharon’s students, she has developed many quick tips to make the process easier that she will be sharing in her classes. Does Sharon have a favorite espadrilles style? She likes — and has a pair — of both flats and wedges. In her Road 2017 classes, students will be making the flat version. At Road 2016, Sharon demonstrated her espadrilles shoes in the EE Schenck Company booth in the Marketplace. It was such a popular demonstration that the Reese family asked her to offer a class at Road 2017. Previously, she has taught her espadrille class for shop owners in Portland, Oregon in 2015. Sharon is excited to share something she loves to make that has become natural to her. Students can expect to finish at least one pair of shoes and hopefully start the second pair before the end of class. Sharon describes her classes as both “fun and educational.” She adds, “We have a good time.”      ]]>

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